Australia’s Eurovision 2020 Entry

One of the nice things about Australia’s continued participation in the Eurovision Song Contest is that we get to learn more about the music scene Down Under. There was a time in the 1980s where Australian pop and rock was making it over to the United States on a regular basis, but the wave gradually petered out. Now, thanks to Eurovision and the YouTube rabbit holes it knocks us into, we are beginning to caught up with what we’ve been missing.

With that off of our chests, let’s get into this year’s Australian entry, Montaigne’s “Don’t Break Me.”

Jessica Cerro had her first break performing under the name Montaigne in 2013 when her first single “I Am Not an End” was featured on Australia’s Triple J radio station. Her debut album Glorious Heights came out in 2016 and reached number four on Australia’s album charts. Later that year, Montaigne won the Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) Award for Breakthrough Artist.

Now, some countries that participate in Eurovision develop a certain sound across their entries. Usually that stems from the roots of those nations’ respective cultures and music industries. Sometimes those sounds come out of an almost organic idea of what a Eurovision song should sound like. (See, for example, the past few entries from the United Kingdom.)

But the most obvious way for a country to proffer a distinctive national sound at Eurovision is to partner up frequently with certain songwriters. Bulgaria’s recent relationship with Symphonix International is one example, and Australia offers up another example with DNA Songs. This songwriting team of David Musumeci and Anthony Egizii co-wrote Jessica Mauboy’s “We Got Love,” Isaiah Firebrace’s “Don’t Come Easy,” and Dami Im’s “Sound of Silence.” That’s 71% of Australia’s output.

“Sound of Silence” is the most obvious forebear to “Don’t Break Me.” They are structurally similar, with quiet verses leading into big choruses. The melodies of the verses and the overall orchestration are similar as well.

The differences lie with the singers: Dami Im is a big belter, whereas Montaigne is a more introverted vocal performer. She is telling a personal story with “Don’t Break Me” and that intimacy makes it distinct.

We are concerned that Montaigne doesn’t quite grab the viewer during the verses. Her vocal at Australia Decides was mumbly during the opening verse (although the sound mix may have played a part in that), so the song didn’t really catch fire until the chorus. Without a bolder staging and a stronger opening, “Don’t Break Me” may not be immediate enough to capture one’s attention.