Iceland’s Eurovision 2020 Entry

A funny thing happened to Iceland in 2019. They got tired of their songs getting lost in the Eurovision Semifinals, so they mixed things up by sending an agitprop anti-capitalist industrial dance collective. It worked out pretty well: Hatari finished 10th in the Grand Final and they only got fined the €5,000 after they waved Palestinian flags in the Tel Aviv green room.

Then it dawned on everyone: hey, maybe the secret to this Eurovision thing is to find acts that stand out. Pretty men singing bland ballads are a dime a dozen. Who else is sending a geeky synth pop band who are obsessed with 8-bit animation, homemade musical instruments, and exquisite choreography?

Daði og Gagnamagnið first competed in Söngvakeppnin in 2017 with “Is This Love,” which finished as the runner up to Svala’s “Paper.” At first glance, the only real difference between “Is This Love” and “Think About Things” is that instead of singing a song to keyboardist Árnýja Fjóla Ásmundsdóttir (who is his wife), Daði Freyr Pétursson is singing a song to his infant daughter (who is not in the band yet). Otherwise, the band is pretty much doing the same thing here as they did during their first go.

But everything is now a bit more polished, a little more slick, and a lot more catchy. They have a keen sense of their own brand, right down to the costuming and the nerdy, yet chic staging. The whole package is evocative of both Napoleon Dynamite’s dance to “Canned Heat” and Pollapönk’s “No Prejudice,” with a little bit of Real Genius thrown in for good measure. It is goofy fun, made more delightful by their attention to detail.

The hidden power of “Think About Things” lies in the collective talent of backing vocalists Hulda Kristín Kolbrúnardóttir and Daði’s sister Sigrún Birna Pétursdóttir. Their vocals have been consistently tight throughout this year’s Söngvakeppnin and they add a professional sheen to the song that elevates the band’s high school talent show aesthetic.

We can imagine that this is not everyone’s cup of tea. A little too twee, a little too precious, or something like that. But we adore it because, to paraphrase a tweet from Elaine O’Neill, Daði og Gagnamagnið just look like us. We could be those kids. We frequently are those kids to this very day. And it’s nice to see someone like us make good.