North Macedonia’s Eurovision 2020 Entry

We have been accused in the past of being Eurovision snobs that have no appreciation of camp and of being Eurovision scows that only care about the trashier side of the Song Contest. We aren’t ashamed to be either of those things because Eurovision wouldn’t be the same if one was missing in favor of the other.

But sometimes our Song Contest duality means that we don’t give certain songs a fair shake because we wanted something else from the artist. They are just doing what they think will work in their repertoire and in the context of a music competition. And here we are judging them using a very arbitrary reason.

Which brings us to Vasil and “You.”

Vasil Garvanliev is a classically trained singer who was a soloist in the Chicago Children’s Choir when he was 12. He studied in the University of Toronto Opera School and the Royal Conservatory of Music Glenn Gould and has performed in operas around the world. But he also has a pop background, starting his performance career when he was seven. He was one of the backing singers for Tamara Todevska at last year’s Eurovision Song Contest, where she totally won the jury vote.

So we’ve got a singer here who can work in both pop and classical vocal styles. When we learned this, we had it in our heads that Vasil was going to be Jacques Houdek 2.0. We wanted that so bad.

Now, this is not a sensible expectation to have. Vasil, wisely, chose to work in his pop voice. Obviously, he was going to do that. Which makes us ask if our disappointment in “You” lies in the intrinsic quality of the song or our unrealistic idea of what it should be.

The answer probably lies in the middle. “You” is an odd song for Eurovision. It’s tango-flecked electronic dance pop that sounds intimate and sensual. Vasil’s vocal is restrained and measured, giving us glimpses of his range without going over the top. We think it would have struggled to qualify for the Grand Final because, well, it’s just not flashy enough. North Macedonia didn’t need to go the full “My Friend,” but we still wish they had been a little less subtle. Maybe that’s an unfair expectation, but there is something to be said for standing out.